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Home Projects 1st call (2008) 2. A solid-state system for non-invasive functional and anatomical imaging of tissue based on time-resolved single photon detector arrays

2. A solid-state system for non-invasive functional and anatomical imaging of tissue based on time-resolved single photon detector arrays

 Dr. E. Charbon (EPFL), Dr. M. Wolf (ETHZ) - PhD student: Juan Mata Pavia

In this project we propose a time-resolved approach for functional and anatomical imaging of human brain and other tissues. The core of the proposed imaging system will be an array of single photon detectors fabricated in standard CMOS technology. Thanks to the system’s time resolution and speed, it will be possible to achieve unprecedented resolution and accuracy, thus enabling new and advanced diagnostic tools. The imaging system will be highly miniaturized and low-cost, useable inside MRI magnets, to be employed in extensive clinical trials, while comparative studies will become more reliable and reproducible due to the inherent quantitative nature of the approach.

Optical Imaging of the brain
One promising novel method to study the brain, which will provide outstanding insights, is near-infrared (NIR) imaging (NIRI). It is used to study brain activity and is a highly sensitive method to detect changes as low as per mill in the cerebral blood circulation and oxygenation. NIRI has several advantages, which make it unique:
• Important physiological parameters such as oxy-, deoxy- and total hemoglobin (O2Hb, HHb and tHb) concentration can be measured with a high sensitivity. These reflect cerebral blood circulation, oxygenation and functional activity.
• NIRI is completely non-invasive without drugs or traces, uses non-ionizing radiation and is appreciated by subjects.
• The spatial resolution is in the order of a cm, the time resolution is high (>50Hz).
• Continuous measurements over extended periods of time (hours) are feasible.
• NIRI is relatively inexpensive and can be miniaturized. We have developed a wireless system[1].

1. T. Mühlemann, D. Haensse, and M. Wolf, "Ein drahtloser Sensor für die bildgebende in-vivo Nahinfrarotspektroskopie," presented at the 3-Ländertreffen der Deutschen, Österreichischen und Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Biomedizinische Technik, Zurich, 2006, pp. P60.

Contact: Juan Mata Pavia

ABSTRACT NCCBI MEETING 2010

ABSTRACT NCCBI MEETING 2011

 
Home Projects 1st call (2008) 2. A solid-state system for non-invasive functional and anatomical imaging of tissue based on time-resolved single photon detector arrays